Laparoscopic Surgery

Inguinal Hernia repair

Inguinal Hernia repair

Hernias can be a serious issue for many of our patients. Hernias can occur when there is a weakening or separation in the strong muscle walls that hold our abdominal organs in place. As the tissue weakens, a small bulge or sack can form from the lining of the abdomen. The internal pressure can often push a loop of your intestine into this bulge.

Gall Bladder removal

Gall Bladder removal

The chance that you have ever heard of laparoscopic cholecystectomy is rare if you are not in the medical field. However, it’s also very likely that you, or somebody you know has completed this procedure. A cholecystectomy is also commonly referred to as a gallbladder removal surgery.

Umbilical Hernia repair

Umbilical Hernia repair

One of the more common hernias requiring surgical attention is umbilical hernias (hernia close to or involving the area around the belly button). Most commonly, these hernias are caused by weakness around the belly button from long, repetitive periods of increased pressure. Women who have been pregnant are particularly susceptible in forming these umbilical hernias because of the weakness of the umbilical region and stretching of tissues during the pregnancy period.

Incisional Hernia repair from previous surgery

Incisional Hernia repair from previous surgery

After one has undergone a surgical operation, there is always a chance of developing a hernia in the location where an incision was made. This is called an incisional hernia. Most often, these incisional hernias develop after a large, midline incision from an “open” procedure; or can develop at the umbilicus (belly button) from a laparoscopic or robotic procedure.

Hiatal Hernia repair

Hiatal Hernia repair

Hiatal hernias are part of a group of hernias around the esophagus, called paraesophageal hernias. The most common of these are called sliding hiatal hernias. These hernias are present in a large percentage of the population, though most patients are without symptoms. Those that do become symptomatic may have gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD).

Appendix removal

Appendix removal

The appendix is usually removed for a condition called acute appendicitis. This condition is usually diagnosed and treated in an emergency situation. On occasion, the appendix may require removal because of growth found, or it has become adhered to other structures causing discomfort or a blockage.e.

Intestinal Adhesion surgery

Intestinal Adhesion surgery

Anytime someone undergoes surgical procedures inside the abdomen, particularly if operating on the small or large intestine, there is the possibility of adhesions. These adhesions develop between intestinal loops and other components inside the abdomen. Sometimes these adhesions can cause blockages that are usually treated without surgery- while occasionally surgical intervention is required.

Diverticular surgery

Diverticular surgery

Diverticulitis comes about from infection of the “outpouches” in the walls of the colon. These outpouches are called diverticuli. Un-inflamed or uninfected diverticuli are referred to as diverticulosis. Those who have been diagnosed with diverticulitis are usually treated with antibiotics by mouth and occasionally require admission into the hospital for bowel rest and intravenous antibiotics. Chronic and repetitive bouts of diverticulitis often require surgical attention.

Colostomy removal

Colostomy removal

There are many reasons patients have colostomies. With some emergent (and non-emergent) colon surgeries, the creation of a colostomy is necessary. After some time (usually 3-6 months), these colostomies can be reversed and normal passage of bowel movements through the rectum and anus can be re-established.

Colon Mass removal

Colon Mass removal

Usually diagnosed on colonoscopy, growths (masses) inside the colon usually require surgical removal. Whether benign or malignant, masses inside the colon can cause bleeding, blockage, or perforation. If small enough, they can sometimes be completely removed during a colonoscopy.

Small Intestinal Mass removal

Small Intestinal Mass removal

Patients who have small intestine masses (growths) often experience on-off bouts with nausea and the feeling of bloatedness. Usually, after several radiographic studies and visits with one or two specialists, small bowel masses are diagnosed. These can be troublesome. Even if ultimately benign, the masses require surgical attention because of their location in the somewhat narrow small intestine. These masses can easily lead to a blockage, much sooner than that of masses in the colon (in general).

Stomach Mass removal

Stomach Mass removal

Stomach masses are usually diagnosed on upper endoscopy, a procedure where a camera is inserted through the mouth into the stomach. If new growth is found to be suspicious, surgical removal may be warranted. In addition, stomach ulcers that have been resistant to healing using non-surgical approaches may need surgical attention (though current medications that reduce acid have been well known to make stomach ulcer surgery rarer).

Spleen Removal

Spleen Removal

Though the indications for removing the spleen has changed over the last several decades, there are still some diseases that are proper, and most effectively, managed by a splenectomy. Most of these conditions are within the category of hematologic illnesses.

Lipoma/soft tissue Mass removal

Lipoma/soft tissue Mass removal

After one has undergone a surgical operation, there is always a chance of developing a hernia in the location where an incision was made. This is called an incisional hernia. Most often, these incisional hernias develop after a large, midline incision from an “open” procedure; or can develop at the umbilicus (belly button) from a laparoscopic or robotic procedure.